Beryls are some of the most valuable of all the coloured gemstones, although pure beryl is colourless and is known as Goshenite. Beryls occur in green, yellow, greenish-yellow, blue to blue-green, red, colourless and pink when tinted by impurities. The pink variety is known as Morganite, red is very rare and known as Bixbite. Golden beryl is a yellow-green and called Heliodor.

The most famous varieties of beryl are Aquamarine and Emerald. Aquamarine come
from the latin aqua marina, meaning, "water of the sea" and is a blue or turquoise. The deep blue version of aquamarine is called maxixe. Maxixe is commonly found in the country of Madagascar. Its color fades to white when exposed to sunlight or is subjected to heat treatment, though the colour returns with irradiation. Emerald are green beryl and are coloured by trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium.

Jet is not actually a stone but the fossilised remains of the water logged monkey puzzle tree and occurs in black or dark brown and is a variety of coal known as lignite with the finest jet coming from England.

Jet has a long history of use with Jet jewellery being produced in Britain as long ago as 1500 B.C. and the ancient Romans importing Jet jewellery made in York. Jet carvings were also used as talismans and for mourning in 14th and 15th century Spain.

Larimar is a rare blue variety of Pectolite, Larimar is found only in the Dominican Republic and is also known as the Dolphin Stone, Blue Pectolite, Atlantis Stone, and Stefilia's Stone. Originally discovered in 1916, it was named by the Dominican who re-discovered it in 1974, taking the first letters of his daughter's name, Larissa, and the Spanish word for the sea, mar, to create Larimar.

Larimar occurs as needle-like crystals, grown together in a solid mass and forms in cavities within basaltic lava. The copper substitution in Pectolite instead of calcium produces beautiful translucent shades of soft blues, white and turquoise marked with streaks and patterns of white, and may contain red or brown areas of oxidation or Hematite inclusions. The more intense the blue and contrast within the stone, the rarer and higher its value. Also the blue is photosensitive and may fade over time if exposed to too much light or heat.

Hessonite Garnet
Enter the name for this tabbed section: Images
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Hessonite Garnet and Apatite
Enter the name for this tabbed section: About the Stones

Hessonite Garnet belongs to the grossularite garnet group, which also includes the rare tsavorite garnet. While most grossularite garnet is green, Hessonite typically has a orange-brown colour and is also known as cinnamon stone, which is a play not only on its colour but because of the land of spices where it originated, Sri Lanka.

Hessonite garnet ranges in color from honey-yellow to orange-brown and brown-red. One of the distinguishing characteristics of hessonite is a "treacly" quality (when viewed under magnification undulating, contorted areas of lesser transparency are visible).

Hessonite is said to bring success in self-initiated businesses based on an original idea or unfilled market niche, and inspires and brings out artistic expression, even in the seemingly untalented.

Enter the name for this tabbed section: Specifications
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Materials
  • Hessonite Garnet
  • Apatite
  • Rolled Gold

  • Length 43cm

Weight
15g

Price $225 AUS
$225
Product Info...
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Hessonite Garnet & Apatite

Price $225
Weight 15g
Length 43cm

As every piece is 'one of a kind', in the rare event that two people manage to order the same item before the system updates it will be first come, first served. Naturally the other buyer will be fully refunded.

Thank you for your understanding, Stephen