Tourmaline is the most colourful of all gemstones and occurs in all colours, but pink, red, green, blue and multicolored are its most well-known colours with blue (Indicolite) being one of the rarer colours.

Liddicoatite tourmaline is a calcium-rich lithium tourmaline, typically exhibiting extraordinarily beautiful geometrically patterned colour zoning usually in the form of triangles or the “Mercedes” star shape.

Scientifically though , tourmaline is not a single mineral, but a group of minerals related in their physical and chemical properties. The mineral Elbaite is the member of the Tourmaline group that is responsible for almost all the gem varieties. Three other members of the group - Schorl, Dravite and Liddicoatite, are seldom used as gemstones.

Beryls are some of the most valuable of all the coloured gemstones, although pure beryl is colourless and is known as Goshenite. Beryls occur in green, yellow, greenish-yellow, blue to blue-green, red, colourless and pink when tinted by impurities. The pink variety is known as Morganite, red is very rare and known as Bixbite. Golden beryl is a yellow-green and called Heliodor.

The most famous varieties of beryl are Aquamarine and Emerald. Aquamarine come
from the latin aqua marina, meaning, "water of the sea" and is a blue or turquoise. The deep blue version of aquamarine is called maxixe. Maxixe is commonly found in the country of Madagascar. Its color fades to white when exposed to sunlight or is subjected to heat treatment, though the colour returns with irradiation. Emerald are green beryl and are coloured by trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium.

Larimar is a rare blue variety of Pectolite, Larimar is found only in the Dominican Republic and is also known as the Dolphin Stone, Blue Pectolite, Atlantis Stone, and Stefilia's Stone. Originally discovered in 1916, it was named by the Dominican who re-discovered it in 1974, taking the first letters of his daughter's name, Larissa, and the Spanish word for the sea, mar, to create Larimar.

Larimar occurs as needle-like crystals, grown together in a solid mass and forms in cavities within basaltic lava. The copper substitution in Pectolite instead of calcium produces beautiful translucent shades of soft blues, white and turquoise marked with streaks and patterns of white, and may contain red or brown areas of oxidation or Hematite inclusions. The more intense the blue and contrast within the stone, the rarer and higher its value. Also the blue is photosensitive and may fade over time if exposed to too much light or heat.

Lapis Lazuli
Enter the name for this tabbed section: Images
Stacks Image 2323
Stacks Image 2332
Lapis and Stirling Silver
Enter the name for this tabbed section: About the Stones

Lapis Lazuli (lapis) is a deep blue stone prized for its intense colour.

Lapis was being mined in the Sar-i Sang mines in the Afghan province of Badakhshan as early as 7000 BC. Lapis beads have been found at neolithic burials in Mehrgarh and Caucasus and was used for the eyebrows on the funeral mask of King Tutankhamun (1341–1323 BC). Greeks spoke of an ancient sapphire which included gold... this was naturaly lapis.

At the end of the Middle Ages, lapis lazuli began to be exported to Europe, where it was ground into powder and made into ultramarine, the finest and most expensive of all blue pigments. It was used by the most important artists of the Renaissance and Baroque , and was often reserved for the clothing of the central figure of the painting, especially the Virgin Mary.

Some believed that dreaming of lapis would foretell a love that would be forever faithful.

Enter the name for this tabbed section: Specifications
Stacks Image 2354
Materials
  • Lapis
  • Sterling Silver

Length 45cm

Weight
65g

Price $155 AUS
$155
Product Info...
Stacks Image 3742
Lapis

Price $155
Weight 65g
Length 45cm

As every piece is 'one of a kind', in the rare event that two people manage to order the same item before the system updates it will be first come, first served. Naturally the other buyer will be fully refunded.

Thank you for your understanding, Stephen