Quartz is the most common mineral found on the Earths surface. It is a significant component of many igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. This natural form of silicon dioxide is found in an impressive range of varieties and colours. There are many names for different varieties. Cryptocrystalline varieties of quartz are generally separated into chalcedony, which includes agate.

The main members of the quartz family are clear (rock crystal), smoky, citrine, rose, amethyst and prasiolite. There are also varieties of quartz with inclusions like rutile, tourmaline, copper and chlorite.

Chrysoberyl is the third hardest mineral on the Mohs scale of hardness. Ordinary chrysoberyl is yellowish-green and transparent to translucent. When the mineral exhibits good pale green to yellow color and is transparent, then it is used as a gemstone. There are three main varieties of Chrysoberyl: ordinary yellow-to-green Chrysoberyl (which was referred to as "chrysolite" during the Victorian and Edwardian eras), Cat's Eye or Cymophane, and Alexandrite...

Top quality Alexandrite is very rare and hardly ever used in modern jewellery. In antique Russian jewellery you may come across it with a little luck, since Russian master jewellers loved this stone. It was named after Russian tsar Alexander II (1818-1881), the very first crystals having been discovered in April 1834 in the emerald mines near the Tokovaya River in the Urals. The discovery was made on the day the future tsar came of age. Although alexandrite is a relatively young gemstone, it certainly has a noble history. Since it shows both red and green, the principal colours of old Imperial Russia, it inevitably became the national stone of tsarist Russia.

Peanut Wood is a silicified (petrified) wood from the Cretaceous age. Peanut Wood is generally black in colour with numerous borings, which were made by a marine wood-boring bivalve shellfish called Teredo. The light coloured areas are what used to be boreholes in the original wood. Peanut Wood is found near Carnarvon, Western Australia and is around 70 million years old.

Mandarin Garnet
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Mandarin Garnet and Old Carnelian Trade Beads
Enter the name for this tabbed section: About the Stones

Mandarin Garnet is a rare form of Spessartine Garnet ,which is one of the lesser-known and rarer varieties of Garnet. The name, "spessartine" comes from the Bavarian word, "Spessart", meaning "forest", which is a mountain range in Germany where spessartine garnet deposits were found in the 1880s.

Mandarin Garnet is valued for its vivid orange color. These gems actually occur in a range of colors from yellowish orange to reddish orange and orange-red. The combination of vivid color and garnet's very high refractive index make Mandarin Garnet one of the most blillant stones n the world of colored gems. The pure orange, known fanta orange, is very rare and has been found in only a few deposits in Africa, notably in Nigeria.

It is said, the energies of Spessartine vibrate at a high rate, imparting a willingness to help others and strengthen the heart. Spessartine also stimulates aspects of creative abilities and energies, encouraging one to take action toward one's dreams, visions and goals. It is a good stone for artists, writers, dancers, actors and others who express through creative energy.

These old Carnelian beads were used for ‘trade’ with the local tribes by the likes of the the Dutch East India Company in the mid 1850’s are now one of the true treasures of these cultures.

Enter the name for this tabbed section: Specifications
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Materials
  • Mandarin Garnet
  • Old Carnelian Beads
  • Rolled Gold

Length 44cm

Weight
95g

Price $395 AUS
$395
Product Info...
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Mandarin Garnet & Old Carnelian

Price $395
Weight 95g
Length 44cm

As every piece is 'one of a kind', in the rare event that two people manage to order the same item before the system updates it will be first come, first served. Naturally the other buyer will be fully refunded.

Thank you for your understanding, Stephen